Paul Cézanne "The Card Players" & Willem de Kooning's "Interchange" The most valuable paintings in private hands - Agent4stars.com - The finer things in Life

Paul Cézanne “The Card Players” & Willem de Kooning’s “Interchange” The most valuable paintings in private hands

 
Rembrandt - Portrait of Jan Six

Rembrandt van Rijn
“Portrait of Jan Six”, 1654
oil on canvas, 112 x 102 cm.
Six Foundation, Amsterdam

Not only the most important work by Rembrandt still in private hands, but also one of the best portraits from the Dutch Golden Era. In the 1650s Rembrandt created some of his most accomplished masterpieces, such as “Aristotle with a Bust of Homer” (1653, Metropolitan Museum) or “A Woman Bathing in a Stream” (1654, National Gallery).

$140-200 million

Some “good” Rembrandts have appeared on the market recently, including “Portrait of a Man with Arms Akimbo” (offered at TEFAF for $47 million) or the “Minerva” (sold for $45 million). However, none of them are comparable to this masterpiece, valued by art dealer Otto Naumann “in excess of $150 million”.

Rembrandt - self-portrait

Rembrandt van Rijn
“Self-portrait”, 1659
oil on canvas, 52.7-42.7 cm.
Duke of Sutherland collection (on loan to the National Gallery of Scotland)

This canvas, painted when the artist was over 50 years old, is arguably one of the best self-portraits ever created, a honest, sincere and ruthless portrait of an artist who had never shown mercy to himself

$100-150 million

No other self-portrait by Rembrandt of such quality has appeared on the market in recent times. Compare with the “Jan Six’ shown above. Though smaller, this canvas is also Rembrandt at his very best

Caravaggio - Conversion of Saint Paul

Caravaggio
“Conversion of Saint Paul”, 1600
oil on cypress wood, 237-189 cm.
Odescalchi Balbi Collection, Rome

This work is one of two paintings by Caravaggio of the same subject, commissioned by Cardinal Cerasi. The large painting was created in 1600, the same year in which Caravaggio completed one of his undisputed masterpieces, “The Calling of Saint Matthew”. Impressive in size and quality of painting, this work ranks among the most important religious scenes by Caravaggio.

$100-150 million (*)

One of the most important artists ever, the works by Caravaggio rarely appear on the market. This is the only “monumental” work by Caravaggio in private hands.

(*) Open market valuation. However, due to Italian export restrictions the painting can not be sold to a foreign buyer.

Leonardo da Vinci - Salvator Mundi

Leonardo da Vinci (attributed to)
“Salvator Mundi”, c-1500-1510
oil on wood, 65.6 x 45.4 cm.
Private collection, New York

Leonardo da Vinci is known to have painted a “Salvator Mundi” for King Louis XII of France. Considered lost by art experts for decades, one of its alleged “copies” was acquired by a group of art dealers in 2005, and reattributed (NOT unanimously) to Leonardo. In late 2011, this work was included in the exhibition “Leonardo da Vinci: Painter at the Court of Milan” at the National Gallery of London.

$80-150 million

How much are collectors willing to pay for a painting whose attribution is still questionable? Its owners, according to several sources, are seeking $200 million (a conservative sum if the painting was unanimously accepted). The Dallas Museum of Art tried to acquire the work in late 2012, but its offer (undisclosed) was rejected.

Velázquez - Prince Baltasar Carlos on horseback

Diego Velázquez 
“Prince Baltasar Carlos on horseback”, 1636
oil on canvas, 144-91 cm.
Duke of Westminster collection

Diego Velázquez´s “Prince Baltasar Carlos on horseback” has all the magnificence you can expect in a great baroque painting. It is a very good Velázquez, arguably his only masterpiece still in private hands, and it could be the centerpiece of any major museum able to persuade the Duke of Westminster to sell it

$80-120 million

The only “great” Velázquez sold in “recent” times is “Juan de Pareja”, bought by the Metropolitan in 1971 for $5.5 million, then the highest price ever paid for a painting at auction. This work is much more important. However, some doubts concerning to the attribution of the work have affected to its previous estimation ($100 – 150 million)

Holbein - Darmstadt Madonna

Hans Holbein the Younger
“The Madonna With the Family of Mayor Meyer (The Darmstadt Madonna)”, c.1525-8
Oil on panel, 146.5-102 cm.
Reinhold Würth collection, Germany

This monumental painted is arguably the most important religious scene ever created by Holbein. The work was commissioned by the Bürgermeister of Basel Jakob Meyer zum Hasen, who opposed the Reformation

$80-120 million (*)

Sold for more than $70 million at a private sale in Germany in 2011. Some sources said that its value on the open market could be “in excess of €100 million”.

(*) Open market valuation. However, due to German export restrictions the painting can not be sold to a foreign buyer.

Caravaggio - The Lute playerCaravaggio - The Lute player

Caravaggio
“The Lute player”, c.1596
oil on canvas, 100-126.5 cm.
Wildenstein collection
“Apollo the Lute player”, c.1596
oil on canvas, 96-121 cm.
Private collection (previously at Badminton House, Gloucestershire)

“The Lute player” is one of the most famous compositions by Caravaggio. Three versions of the painting exist, the two displayed here and a third version at the Hermitage Museum, Saint Petersburg. They are a stunning testament of Caravaggio’s use of the ‘chiaroscuro’. The androgynous young man is also a typical figure in Caravaggio’s oeuvre, as well as the still life elements on the table, specially at the Badminton version

$75-100 million (each)

When the second version was displayed at the Salander Gallery in 2007, Art dealer Lawrence Salander (later filed for bankruptcy) said that the painting was “the most important painting ever sold” (false), and that $100 million would be “cheap” (debatable). This painting was sold at Sotheby’s for just $110,000 in 2001, when it was still considered to be a “copy after Caravaggio”. There are still some doubts concerning to the attribution of the second painting, so the estimation for it may be lower

Botticelli - Story of Nastagio degli Onesti

Sandro Botticelli
“The Story of Nastagio degli Onesti (forth episode)”, c.1483
tempera on panel, 83-142 cm.
Private collection, Florence

The last panel of this important series by Botticelli. The three other panels are exhibited in the Prado Museum, Madrid.

$70-100 million (*)

No other Botticelli of such quality has appeared on the market in recent times.

(*) Open market valuation. However, due to Italian export restrictions the painting can not be sold to a foreign buyer.

Titian - Portrait of a man

Titian
“Portrait of a young man”, c.1515-20
oil on canvas, 92.7-70.7 cm.
Earl of Halifax collection (on loan to the National Gallery, London)

An early masterpiece by Titian, arguably his best portrait still in private hands. The work shows the influence of Giorgione, and has a fabulous provenance

$70-90 million

The painting is currently for sale for an asking price of £50 million. Another masterful portrait by Titian (“Alfonso d’Avalos) was bought by the Getty Museum for $70 million (not confirmed) in 2004

Rembrandt - Judas returning the 30 pieces of silver

Rembrandt van Rijn
“Judas returning the 30 pieces of silver”, 1629
oil on canvas, 79-102.3 cm.
Marquess of Normanby collection

An early masterwork by Rembrandt, in which the artist already shows his masterful use of the light / shadow and his personal use of the perspective as a narrative tool

$70-90 million

Auction record for a religious scene by Rembrandt is $25.8 million (“Saint James the Greater”, in 2008) but this work is much better

Holbein - Erasmus

Hans Holbein the Younger
“Desiderius Erasmus of Rotterdam”, 1523
oil and tempera on panel, 76 × 51 cm
Private collection, Penrhyn Castle, Wales

Holbein painted three portraits of Erasmus, of which this version is the largest and the most elaborate. One of the most famous paintings by an old master still in private hands, this work is a masterpiece of Renaissance portraiture

$60-90 million

Compare with the “Darmstadt Madonna” listed above. Though not as monumental, this is another highly important work by Holbein, and one of the most famous portraits of Erasmus.

Caravaggio - Sacrifice of Isaac

Caravaggio
“Sacrifice of Isaac”, c.1598
oil on canvas, 116-173 cm.
Barbara Piasecka Johnson collection

Painted one year before Caravggio’s great masterpiece “The calling of Saint Matthew”, this work encompasses all the mastery of the great genious of the early Baroque painting

$60-90 million

Arguably the best painting by Caravaggio that could be sold on the open market (it is a more mature work than “The Lute Player”), some doubts about its attribution could affect to its hypothetical selling price. Otherwise, $100 million would be a conservative estimation.

Velázquez - Isabel de Borbón

Diego Velázquez
“Isabel de Borbón”, 1631-1632
oil on canvas, 207 x 119 cm.
Private collection, New York

This imposing work -one of the three portraits of the Queen painted by Velázquez- was created after the artist’s return from his first trip to Italy, and it is considered one of his first “mature” works.

$60-80 million

It is hard to estimate the value of a great Velázquez. When the “Portrait of a man” from the Metropolitan was finally attributed to the master, some experts valued it at $40 million. This, of course, is a much more important work.

Titian - The Three Ages of man

Titian
“The Three Ages of man”, ca. 1512-14
oil on canvas, 90 x 150.7 cm.
Duke of Sutherland collection (on loan to the National Gallery of Scotland)

An early masterpiece by Titian, showing the influence of Giorgione and Giovanni Bellini.

$50-75 million

More important than the “Venus Anadyomene”, bought from the same collection for £11 million (narket value of around £20 million), but not as great as the “Diana and Actaeon” sold for £50 million in 2009.

Rembrandt - Portrait of Catrina Hooghsaet

Rembrandt van Rijn
“Portrait of Catrina Hooghsaet”, 1657
oil on canvas, 126-98.5 cm.
Private collection, Penrhyn Castle, Wales

Self-confident in her authoritative pose, this powerful portrait is a stunning example of Rembrandt’s late portraits. Also, it has a fabulous provenance, being part of a private collection in the United Kingdom for over a century

$50-75 million

The painting is “unofficially” at the market, asking price £40 million. Rijksmuseum Amsterdam tried to acquire it, but finally refused even though it had raised almost €34 million in 2008

Raphael - Bridgewater madonna

Raphael
“Bridgewater madonna”, c.1507
oil on canvas, 82-57 cm.
Duke of Sutherland collection (on loan to the National Gallery of Scotland)

Raphael’s finest madonnas, such as this, rank among the most recognizable images of the Italian Renaissance. The simple but strong composition and the graceful face of the virgin are stunning

$50-75 million

A smaller madonna by Raphael, the “Madonna of the pinks”, was acquired by the UK in 2004 for £22 million. Auction record for Raphael is $47.9 million for the drawing “Head of a muse”, in December 2009

Raphael - The Holy Family with a Palm Tree

Raphael
“The Holy Family with a Palm Tree”, c.1506
oil on canvas, diameter: 101 cm.
Duke of Sutherland collection (on loan to the National Gallery of Scotland)

Not as famous as the previous work, this beautiful tondo is also part of the fabulous collection of the Duke of Sutherland. The figures and the landscape show the influence of Leonardo da Vinci

$50-75 million

See previous work.

Rembrandt - The Standard-Bearer

Rembrandt van Rijn
“The Standard-Bearer”, 1636
oil on canvas, 118.8 x 96.8 cm.
Elie de Rothschild collection, Paris

During the decade of the 1630s, Rembrandt created several important portraits, sometimes with the assistant of his workshop. “The Standard-Bearer” ranks among the finest.

$50-75 million

A very strong Rembrandt. “Minerva”, a painting created one year before this work, was sold in the mid-2000s for a rumoured $45 million (around $50 million now). This is a more famous painting

J.M.W. Turner - Seascape, Folkestone

Joseph Mallord William Turner
“Seascape, Folkestone”, 1845
oil on canvas, 88.3-117.5 cm.
New York , private collection

Turner at his best. The greatest work by Turner in private hands is an audacious, almost abstract masterpiece

$50-75 million

Sold for £7.3 million in 1984 (then an auction record for any painting) Auction record for a Turner is £29.7 million ($44 million) for “Modern Rome – Campo Vaccino”, at Sotheby’s London, July 2010.

 

Image
Author / work / owner
 estimation
Paul Cézanne - The Card Players

Paul Cézanne
“The Card Players”, 1892-93
oil on canvas, 97 × 130 cm.
Private collection, Qatar

This is the last version of this famous composition by Paul Cézanne. The fabulous psychological intensity in the faces of the players make this painting a masterpiece of post-impressionist art

$140-200 million

Unlike Picasso or Van Gogh, Cézanne is an artist whose great works appear very rarely on the art market. “Card players” is widely considered the best Cézanne in private hands. Reportedly sold to Qatar for $250 million in 2011.

Pablo Picasso - Les noces de Pierrette

Pablo Picasso
“Les noces de Pierrette”, 1905
oil on canvas, 115-195 cm.
image: © Estate of Pablo Picasso/ ARS
Private collection, Japan

The “Sleeping Beauty” of the art market, stored like a fine wine in a bank’s vault since the early 90s. Arguably the best Picasso still in private hands, this painting is masterful in all senses, and concentrates all the magic, mystery and melancholy of Picasso’s Blue and Pink periods

$100-150 million

Sold for $51.67 million in Paris, 1989 ($86 million now). Picasso’s masterpieces have considerably increased their values: “Garçon a la pipe” was sold for $104 million in 2004 (world auction record), and “The dream” (see below) was about sold for a spectacular $155 million in 2013

Vincent van Gogh - Portrait of Doctor Gachet

Vincent van Gogh
“Portrait of Doctor Gachet”, 1890
oil on canvas, 68-57 cm.
Private collection

The story about this famous and brilliant work resumes by itself the “Japanese buyer boom” of the late 80s and early 90s. The whereabouts of the painting are now unknown. Some sources places it in Europe, waiting for its return to the Art market

$100-150 million

Sold for $82.5 million in 1990 (then an auction record, equivalent to almost $130 million now) Re-sold in the late 90s for an unknown price (some sources said $90 million in 1997) to an anonymous private collector

Munch - The Scream

Edvard Munch
“The Scream”, 1895
Pastel on board, 79 x 59 cm.
Petter Olsen collection, Norway

“The Scream” is one of the most famous paintings in the world. Munch created four versions of this work (one tempera, two pastels and a litograph) and this version is the only one in private hands.

$100-140 million

Sold for $119,9 million in 2012, a world record for any painting at auction. This work is a true icon, an extremely desirable painting. However, it is not the “prime” version (which can be easily valued at over $200 million)

Pablo Picasso - La rêve (the dream)

Pablo Picasso
“La rêve (the dream)”, 1932
oil on canvas, 130-97 cm.
image: © Estate of Pablo Picasso/ ARS
Steven Cohen collection

This sensual work is the best “mature” portrait by Picasso still in private hands, depicting his lover Marie-Therese Walter sitting on a red armchair with her eyes closed

$100-140 million

Sold for $48.4 million in New York, 1997. Almost sold privately for $139 million in 2006, but it was damaged by its previous owner (Steve Wynn) before the sale. Sold in 2013 for $155 million.

Claude Monet - Le bassin aux nympheas, reflets du sauceno color reproductions available

Claude Monet
“Le bassin aux nymphéas, reflets du saule (reflections of the weeping willow over the water lilies pond”)”, c.1920-26
oil on canvas, 200-425 cm.
Private collection

Hidden in a private collection for decades, this monumental canvas is the most important Monet in private hands

$90-120 million

Auction record for Monet is $80.6 million for a smaller (100-200 cm.) “nympheas” canvas (see below). This is the only “monumental” canvas of the nympheas series still in private hands.

Pablo Picasso: 'Nude, Green Leaves and Bust'

Pablo Picasso
“Nude, Green Leaves and Bust”, 1932
oil on canvas, 162-132 cm.
image: © Estate of Pablo Picasso/ ARS
Private collection

This sensual and colorful masterpiece by Picasso is the most expensive painting ever sold at auction. The work had been never exhibited in public since 1961

$90-110 million

Sold for $106.5 million in New York, May 2010 (then an auction record for a work of art)

Pablo Picasso - Garçon a la pipe

Pablo Picasso
“Garçon a la pipe”, 1904
oil on canvas, 100-81.3 cm.
image: © Estate of Pablo Picasso/ ARS
Private collection

The sale of this young smoker was a milestone in the Art auctions world, being the first painting that reached the $100 million barrier

$90-105 million

Sold for $104.1 million in New York, 2004 (then an auction record)

Vincent van Gogh - Self-portrait with bandaged ear

Vincent van Gogh
“Self-portrait with bandaged ear” , 1889
oil on canvas, 60.5-50 cm.
Niarchos collection

Van Gogh’s self portraits rank among the most famous images in the history of Western painting. This highly important work was previously in the collection of Leigh B. Block in Chicago

$80-100 million

Quietly purchased by the Niarchos family for a rumoured price of $80/90 million in early 90s. A less important self-portrait by Van Gogh was sold for $71.5 million in 1998

Wassily Kandinsky - Composition V

Wassily Kandinsky
“Composition V”, 1911
oil on canvas, 190-275 cm.
Ronald Lauder collection

One of the most important paintings still in private hands. With its impressive scale and its rich composition, the canvas is a quintessence of early abstraction.

$75-100 million

Sold for $40 – 50 million in 1998 at a private sale. No other Kandinsky of such importance has been sold in recent times

Pierre Auguste Renoir - Dance at le Moulin de la Gallette

Pierre Auguste Renoir
“Dance at le Moulin de la Gallette”, 1876
oil on canvas, 78-114 cm.
Private collection, Europe

Although it is only the smaller version of the famous painting exhibited at the Orsay, a lot of collectors would kill to be the owner of “the most beautiful painting of the XIX”, in the words of some art critics

$75-100 million

Sold for $78.1 million in 1990. Resold for a lower price in a private sale, c.1998

Pablo Picasso - Nu au fauteuil noir

Pablo Picasso
“Nu au fauteuil noir”, 1932
oil on canvas, 161.9-130 cm.
image: © Estate of Pablo Picasso/ ARS
Private collection

Picasso’s sensual portraits from the early 30s ranks among his greatest achievements, and of course among the most coveted artworks. Impressive in scale, this canvas depicts his lover Marie-Therese Walter

$75-100 million

Sold for $45 million in 1999. Compare with “The dream” (see above), which was sold for $48 million in 1997 and was later valued at $139 million in 2006; and with the “Nude, Green Leaves and Bust”, sold for $106.5 million in 2010

Paul Cézanne - Mont Sainte-Victoire vu des Lauves

Paul Cézanne
“Le Mont Sainte-Victoire vu des Lauves”, 1904
oil on canvas, 65-81 cm.
Private collection

This is one of the best depictions of the Mount Sainte-Victoire painted by Cézanne.

$70-100 million

“La Montagne Sainte Victoire”, a less developed and less important depiction of the same Mount, was sold at Phillips for $38.1 million in 2001. This canvas, however, is a supreme masterpiece, one of the best examples in the whole series.

Klimt - Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer II

Gustav Klimt
“Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer II”, 1912
oil on canvas, 190-120 cm.
Private collection

Second version of the more famous “Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I”. This appealing canvas was the star lot in a highly succesful auction in which four works by Klimt -including this- totalled a stunning $192 million

$75-95 million

Sold for $88 million at Christie’s New York, 2006. The “Adele Bloch-Bauer I” (now at the Neue Galerie in New York) sold for $135 million earlier that year.

Pablo Picasso - Femme Assise dans un Jardin

Pablo Picasso
“Femme Assise dans un Jardin”, 1938
oil on canvas, 130-97 cm.
image: © Estate of Pablo Picasso/ ARS
Private collection

This brightly colored canvas was painted in a single day, when the artist was 57 years old, and depicts his mistress Dora Maar

$75-95 million

Sold for $49.5 million at Sotheby’s New York, 1999, then the second highest price ever paid for a Picasso. Comparable to the “Dora Maar au chat” sold for $95 million in 2006 (see comments below)

Pablo Picasso - Dora Maar au chat

Pablo Picasso
“Dora Maar au chat”, 1941
oil on canvas, 130-97 cm.
image: © Estate of Pablo Picasso/ ARS
Private collection (Boris Ivanishvili?)

Dora Maar (1907-1997) met Picasso in 1930, and their relationship lasted until 1946. A native from Paris, Maar was one of Picasso’s favourite models

$75-95 million

Sold for $95.2 million at Sotheby’s New York, 2006. As said before, art market for modern paintings is ‘colder’ now, and this painting is not a masterpiece, though it is certainly a stunning composition

Van Gogh - Portrait de l'artiste sans barbe

Vincent van Gogh
“Portrait de l’artiste sans barbe”, 1889
oil on canvas, 40-31 cm.
Private collection

This is the last self-portrait Van Gogh ever painted, and, along with the “Self-portrait with bandaged ear” (see above), the only one still in private hands. Enough to make it one of the most coveted paintings, though it is really not a masterwork

$75-95 million

Sold for $71.5 million (almost $95 million now) at Christie’s New York, 1998, a remarkable price given the economical situation of that time.

Paul Gauguin - Riders on the beach

Paul Gauguin
“Riders on the beach”, 1902
oil on canvas, 73 x 92 cm.
Niarchos collection

The whole picture is filled with the melancholic taste of a farewell, predicting the artist’s own death a few months later. This fancy coloured work is Gauguin’s pictorial testament and an eloquent ode to the Polynesia

$65-90 million

World auction record for Gauguin is $40.3 million for another Tahitian scene, “L’homme à la hache”, in 2006. Other two Tahitian scenes were sold for $39.2 million in 2004 and 2007. Widely exhibited and published, this work should be considered Gauguin’s finest work still in private hands

Claude Monet - Le Bassin Aux Nymphéas

Claude Monet
“Le Bassin Aux Nymphéas”, 1919
oil on canvas, 100.4 × 201 cm.
Private collection

One of the best examples of the large-scale “Nymphéas” series

$65-85 million

Sold for £40.9 million ($80.5 million) in 2008, an auction record for Monet

Vincent van Gogh - The Town Hall at Auvers

Vincent van Gogh
“The Town Hall at Auvers”, 1890
oil on canvas, 72 x 93 cm
Private collection

This painting, sometimes called “Auvers Town Hall on 14 July 1890”, is one of the most original late compositions by Van Gogh, painted a few days before his suicide.

$60-90 million

Late works by Van Gogh are very sought-after. “Le jardin à Auvers”, created in the same month, was valued at $40 million in 1992.

 

 

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Author / work / owner
 estimation
Willem de Kooning - Woman III

Willem de Kooning
“Woman III”, 1951
oil on canvas, 171-121 cm.
image: © Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY
Steve Cohen collection

This painting is the only “Woman” by Willem de Kooning still in private hands.

$100-140 million

Sold for $137.5 million at a private sale, 2006. By far the most important work by the artist in private hands.

Jackson Pollock - Number 5 A

Jackson Pollock
“Number 5”, 1948
oil on canvas, 243.8-121.9 cm.
image: © Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY
Private collection, USA

Another stunning drip by Pollock, done on a sheet of fiberboard with brown and yellow paint over it

$100-140 million

Sold for $140 million at a private sale, 2006, which is the highest price ever paid for a contemporary painting. The buyer was rumoured to be Mexican businessman David Martínez, though he later denied it

Andy Warhol - Mao

Andy Warhol
“Mao”, 1972
oil on canvas, 448-346.7 cm.
image: © Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY. Courtesy Christie’s Images Ltd
Private collection

This giant canvas is one of the largest portraits of the communist leader painted by the Pop-Art icon, Andy Warhol

$80-120 million

The painting is reportedly for sale, asking price: $120 million. Given the latest market trends, a valuation of $90 – 100 million seems more plausible. The highest price ever paid for a Warhol is the $100 million paid for “Eight Elvises” (see below).

Jasper Johns - Diver

Jasper Johns
“Flag”, 1958
oil on canvas
image: © Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY
Collection Steven Cohen

“Flags” are Jasper Johns most famous works. The artist painted his first American flag in 1954–55, a work now at the MoMA.

$80-120 million

Reportedly sold to Steven Cohen in 2010 for $110 million. Johns early “Flags” are very coveted: in 1980, the Whitney Museum bought “Three Flags” (1958) for the then highest price ever paid for the work of a living artist.

Jasper Johns - Diver

Jasper Johns
“Diver”, 1962
oil on canvas, 228.6-431.8 cm
image: © Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY
Collection Norman and Irma Braman

One of the largest and most important works by Johns, measuring over 4 meters in length

$80-100 million

Sold for just $4.2 million in 1988 (then an auction record for Johns, now a bargain) It is a more important work than “False start”, which was sold for $80 million in 2006 (see below)

Andy Warhol - Eight Elvises

Andy Warhol
“Eight Elvises”, 1963
oil on canvas
image: © Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY
Private collection

An icon of the Pop Art, Warhol used to create several versions of his works. Nevertheless, “Eight Elvises” is an unique composition

$80-100 million

Sold privately for $100 million in 2008 (previously at the Annibale Berlingieri collection)

Francis bacon - Tryptich, 1976Francis Bacon
“Tryptich, 1976”, 1976
oil on canvas, 198-442.5 cm.
image: © Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY
Private collection (Roman Abrahamovich?)

The greatest work by Bacon in private hands, the work draws on Ancient Greek mythology to express Bacon’s personal tragedy

$75-90 million

Sold for $86.3 million at Sotheby’s NY, May 2008. Though Art market for Bacon is now “colder”, this work is a true masterpiece

Jasper Johns - False start

Jasper Johns
“False start”, 1959
oil on canvas, 170.8 x 137.2 cm
image: © Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY
Steve Cohen collection

Another “classic” work by Johns, right now the most expensive painting by a living artist

$70-90 million

Sold privately for $80 million in 2006

Mark Rotho - White center (Yellow, Pink and Lavender on Rose

Mark Rothko
“White center (Yellow, Pink and Lavender on Rose)”, 1950
oil on canvas, 213.4 x 141 cm.
image: © Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY
Al-Thani Family Collection, Qatar

Rothko at his best, though a bit smaller than the “White band” (see below)

$70-90 million

Sold for $72.8 million in 2007, still an auction record for Rothko. Though not the most expensive, this work is arguably the most important Rothko in private hands

Willem de Kooning - Interchange

Willem de Kooning
“Interchange”, 1955
oil on canvas, 200.7-175.7 cm.
image: © Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY
David Geffen collection

This 200.7 x 175.3 cm. canvas is arguably the greatest “classic” work by de Kooning in private hands, even better than the “Police Gazette” purchased by Mr. Cohen for $63 million in 2006

$65-85 million

Sold for $20.6 million in 1989 (then an auction record for a contemporary painting)

Andy Warhol - Shot Marilyns

Andy Warhol
“Shot Marilyns”, 1964
Five oil on canvas, each 101.6 x 101.6 cm.
image: © Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY
‘Turquoise Marilyn’ at S. Cohen Collection
‘Red Marilyn’ at Niarchos Collection
‘Blue Marilyn’ at Peter Brant Collection (another one in a private collection)
‘Orange Marilyn’ at S. I. Newhouse Collection

Warhol’s portraits of Marilyn Monroe rank among the most iconic artworks ever created.

$65-85 million (each)

In 1989, the “Red” canvas was sold for $4.1 million. 9 years later, the “Orange” painting was sold for $17.3 million. And 9 years later, the “Turquoise” canvas (the only one that was not shot by Dorothy Podber) was sold for a rumoured $80 million.

Francis Bacon - Tryptich, May-June 1973

Francis Bacon
“Tryptich, May-June 1973”, 1973
oil on canvas, 198-442.5 cm.
image: © Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY
Esther Grether collection, Switzerland

This monumental tryptich (one of the three “Black Tryptichs” by Bacon) was created in memory of Bacon’s lover, George Dyer

$65-85 million

Compare with “Tryptich, 1976” (see above). This tryptich was sold in 1989 for $6.3 million, then an auction record for Bacon. Another tryptich by Bacon, (Triptych 1974-77) was sold for £26.3 million ($51.7 million) in 2008

Mark Rotho - White band, number 27

Mark Rothko
“White band, number 27”, 1954
oil on canvas, 220 x 205.7 cm.
image: © Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY
Anne Marion Collection

There are still several great Rothkos in private hands, but this very large canvas is one of the most important

$60-80 million

See “White center (Yellow, Pink and Lavender on Rose)”

Jasper Johns - Target with Plaster Casts

Jasper Johns
“Target with Plaster Casts”, 1955
oil on canvas, 129.5 x 111.8 cm.
image: © Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY
David Geffen Collection

A pivotal work by Johns. Along with “Flag” and “Target with Four Faces” (both at the MOMA, New York), this painting is Johns first masterpiece.

$60-80 million

Arguably the most important Johns in private hands, it is not as “painterly” as “Diver” or “False Start” (see above).

Andy Warhol - 200 soup cans (Campbell's Soup)

Andy Warhol
“200 soup cans (Campbell’s Soup)”, 1962
oil on canvas, 182.9 x 254.6 cm
image: © Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY
John and Kimiko Powers collection

The largest work of Warhol’s iconic “Campbell’s Soup” series

$60-80 million

“200 one dollar bills” was sold for $43.8 million in 2009, but works from “Campell’s Soup Cans” are much more famous and coveted. Auction record for Warhol is $71.7 million (“Green Car Crash”, 2007, see below)

Andy Warhol - Green Car Crash (Green Burning Car I)

Andy Warhol
“Green Car Crash (Green Burning Car I)”, 1962
oil on canvas, 228.6 x 203.2 cm
image: © Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY
Niarchos collection

An important work by Andy Warhol, one of the best from his seminal “Death and Disaster” series.

$60-80 million

Sold for $71.7 million in 2007, an auction record for Warhol.

Jackson Pollock - White cockatoo - Number 24A

Jackson Pollock
“White cockatoo – Number 24A”, 1948
oil on canvas, 88.9 x 289.5 cm.
image: © Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY
Private collection, California

This large (over 9 feet long) and stunning canvas dates from Pollock’s “golden age” (1947-1953)

$60-80 million

Not a “perfect” Pollock as “Lucifer” or “Number 5” (see above), but also an important work

Roy Lichtenstein - Masterpiece

Roy Lichtenstein
“Masterpiece”, 1962
oil on canvas, 137.2 x 137.2 cm
image: © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein/DACS
Collection of Agnes Gund, New York

Lichtenstein is “the next real thing” in the contemporary Art market. Pollock, de Kooning, Rothko, Warhol, Johns and Rothko are now the artists whose works can be sold for more than $50 million. But Lichtenstein will be added to that group soon. Time to time

$60-80 million

Auction record for Lichtenstein is $42,6 million for “Ohhh…Alright…” (1964) in 2010. This is a more important work, his first great “comic” painting after the “Look Mickey” from the National Gallery of Washington.

Roy Lichtenstein - Torpedo... Los!

Roy Lichtenstein
“Torpedo… Los!”, 1963
oil on canvas, 172.7 x 203.2 cm
image: © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein/DACS
Charles Simonyi collection

Lichtenstein’s “war paintings” rank among his most recognizable creations. This work was painted in the same year than the “Whaam!” diptych (London, Tate Modern), arguably his most important work

$60-80 million

Sold for $5.5 million in 1989. Sold privately for $14 million in 1998 (in both ocassions a record for the artist).

Francis Bacon - Study for a Self-Portrait—Triptych

Francis Bacon
“Study for a Self-Portrait — Triptych”, 1985–86
oil on canvas, 198-442.5 cm.
image: © Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY
Private collection

One of Bacon’s last masterpieces, and also the only full-length self-portrait that Bacon ever made.

$60-80 million

One of his most famous large triptychs. Not as colorful as some of his works from the 70s (compare with the “Triptych 1976” above), but its historical importance is remarkable.

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